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are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
health and science reporter carolyn johnson has a look. >>> normal breaths for now. >> richard was a few strokes from the green when a strange feeling interrupted his round of golf. he knew he was uncomfortable but the symptoms were vague. >> i got a burning sensation across my chest. it was not a pain. >> now it could be gastrointestinal, it could be their lungs or it could be a heart blockage and my job is listening to them and ferret out more selective symptoms that may pinpoint whether they have heart disease. >> the cardiologist said the goal is to avoid running everybody through tests which are effective but also carry side effects. >> ten years of radiation you get in that procedure. >> it includes prescreening patients with a cardiostress test, often involving a treadmill. now a bay area company believes it has an alternative that can help spot which patients are more likely suffering from heart disease more quickly. >> maybe an alcohol pad, bandaid, gauze. >> it was developed by palo alto based dx. it involves a blood draw that can be done at a doctors office but what happens af
here at that meeting. what do we know from the science? you can see the scientific references and see where the studies were done at different research universities, the mayo clinic, harvard, and other places to see what the confirmation is all about. we can see that it improves the basics. , u r her rider, your engagement is stronger. every improvement translates to about 14 years on the average. after they are trained, the improvement would give them the memory level of an average person of about 56. we see faster and sharper thinking and acting. almost everything you do that involves making a decision about what you have seen or heard or acting in a complex behavior. this is certainly important from the point of view of for your sustaining independence. this is kind of interesting thing, right? people see things so much better that they have about half as many driving accidents, it makes a big difference in the safety of driving and also walking. we have seen improvements in health. the person spends about $300 less a year in health-care costs, that is because the brain training co
is sort of the science of the campaign. the obama campaign has its ground game down to precise numbers, who they have to turn out where, they're spending so much time and money figuring this out. that's science. the romney campaign is passion, energy, they're coming on, their campaign seems a little more excited. part of that's the nature of being a challenger versus an incumbent running a re-election. depending on which city you're in, boston or chicago, you come out with two different -- both make really compelling cases for themselves. the polls are tight enough that either one could be totally not spinning and believing it, but who knows? >> who knows? >> tom brokaw, just final thoughts in the final days of the campaign, how much should the events matter? then you've got the science of the campaign muddled by the storm. >> well, if nothing happens that is unexpected between now and then, the scenario is going to be does the romney wave override the obama ground game and getting out the vote? the romney people have been counting on what happened with reagan, as you know, in 1980. di
of the bay, those places we expect 3 to 6 feet, maybe a meter higher than that. this is not an exact science and we don't have much data to work with. >> right. but you know it's going to be hitting in less than 15 minutes now. the key here to talk about also, victor, this will be a sustained wave, that is what we understand? how long could the wave -- >> yeah, fortunately, you know, in terms of the characteristics of the tsunami, we notice that the period in the near field, it was very short. in order of 10, 15 minutes between successive waves. remember, i want to remember, people, tsunami is not one wave, it's a train of waves. meaning that several waves in succession, they keep coming. so when you go to the far field in hawaii, we expect between waves around 25 minutes between them. so it's a relatively short period for a tsunami. that means it's not going to be as bad, for example, as tohoku, japan or anything like that, or the chile tsunami. it's not something of that magnitude. but yeah, you can have damage, you can have severe effects at several locations. >> well, it's good that you
'll send it back to youm. >> thank you, lara. >>> back out to sam, walk me through the science here, how long could they be on alert in hawaii? >> dan, first of all, as soon as that earthquake happened, knowing that it's 7.7, they did all of the right things. they put the warnings out, thinking that may this would be a bad run of waves. evacuating those lower levels of hawaii were a very good idea. so, you e initially think that first wave would run away from that, remember, this is a subsiding zone, one plate is underneath another plate. a little wave or two and one or two, three, in this case four waves went out and went toward hawaii and down the coast of california as well. now, normally, you would look for the bigger waves and the bigger tsunami problems, at an 58 or 9, they did the absolute right thing by getting those sirens out. these waves have been traveling, like two to four feet in many locations, you can't give everyone the all-clear until the entire system said that the water has traveled. until the buoys have said it's all calm you can't give the all clear. there may be mo
science guy. i have to tell you, michael bloomberg is an opportunist. you violated the new york city charter by running for a third term as mayor. we are in a very dire state here and i wish republicans run the country would offer us new york republicans help and an opportunity to really balance out the political system here. host: thank you for the call this morning. if a time for a few more calls. all weekend long we will be featuring the history and literary life of vermont capital city with a population of just about 8000 people. the smallest united states state capitol. here is the mayor talking about the city. [video clip] >> it is the smallest state capital and america. in terms of vermont, we have the largest historic district in the state. it is a very historic community, founded in 1791. it is run to about 20,000 during the day. largely because of the jobs that are here, the center of commerce and the area. we are fortunate here that we are somewhat insulated from a lot of the trends that occurred nationally. our economy is pretty stable because we rely on the state as a pr
. and rather than vesting in solar we'll invest in signs science and research and by 2020 we will achieve north american energy independence. [applause] we'll make trade work for america. we'll open more markets for american agriculture and we'll hold accountable any nation that doesn't play by the rules. i'm going to stand up for the rights and interest of american workers and employers. and we're going to grow jobs by make ug america the best place for business and manufacturers. this will mean updating regulations while lowering deductions and closing loopholes and make it clear that unlike the current administration, we actually like business and the jobs that business creates. [applause] and finally, as we create more opportunity, we'll make sure that our citizens have the skills they need. training programs will be where the people live and schools will put the interest of our kids and teachers and parents above the interests of the teacher's unions. when we do those five things, this economy is going to come roaring back. we're going to create 12 million new jobs in four years, we'll see
sight. the california science center will open its public display on the shuttle today. it will be on display at exposition park. it arrived after flying over a number of landmarks in california. the shuttle made a 12 mi. journey through the streets of los angeles where it estimated 1 million spectators watched it go by. with russia that live as well. the new exhibit will include two parts. before entering law call you a tour an exhibit that tells the story of california's aerospace industry in the shuttle program. it features videos, images, and artifacts, including endeavour's toilet and kitchen. visitors will enter the samuel auction pavilion. if you need a up close and personal look. still ahead on the kron 4 morning knows hurricane sandy strike and the east coast leaving residents without power and also leaving city officials dealing with flooding fires and damaged buildings plus the gian about before tomorrow morning. plus will be keeping an eye on the skies with erica she will be along with a check of whether in george will be along with with a check of whether i
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >> announcer: meet mary. she loves to shop online with her debit card, and so does bill, an identity thief who stole mary's identity, took over her bank accounts and stole her hard-earned money. now meet jack. after 40 years, he finally saved enough to enjoy retirement. angie, the waitress at jack's favorite diner, is also enjoying his retirement. with just a little information, she's opened up a credit line, draining the equity in jack's home. unfortunately, millions of americans just like you learn all it may take is a little misplaced information to wreak havoc on your life. this is identity theft, and no one helps stop it better than lifelock. see, ordinary credit monitoring services tell you after your identity has been stolen. they may take 30 days to alert you-- too late for jack. lifelock has the most comprehensive identity theft protection available. if mary had lifelock's bank account alerts, she may have been notified in time to help stop it. if j
as once predicted. >>> back out to sam, talk us through the science here. how much longer should they be nervous in hawaii? >> good news, dan, is they did everything right here. 7.7 off the western coast of canada, and nothing but open water between it and hawaii. the plate lying underneath it. it creates a wave. in this case, they thought it was four waves. as we have been counting them. they have the tsunami warning center. all of these buoys that are between that coastline and hawaii, they're able to monitor the lift in that water. buoy, as the water comes up, the sensor knows how high wave that is. these waves could have been ablgt-foot waves. the good news is, we have kind of seen those waves move through. more than one. in this case, they're able to see, we feel pretty good about it. if there's not any more activity, people can relax now. and move toward the coastline. but the very good news here, they did everything right. they set off the warnings as soon as there were a 7 or above. at a 7, you still want people to be prepared. you don't know if those waves are going to p
, climate change is not even gotten talked about. having all this freakish weather and all the science is so overwhelming about climate, yet you don't see it on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab of stuff during your tenure at abc in say, we have to cover this war? >> there were several we have had discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> when you cast your ballot for president, you'll also help shape the financial future of america. ali velshi shines some light on that issue. >> reporter: theoretically, the federal reverse is independent of the president and the executive branch of government. but presidents do appoint the chairman of the fed. so it matters to you and your money who sits in that seat. alan blinder is a professor of economics at princeton university. he's a former federal reverse vice chairman. thank you for joining us. it's good to see you. let's talk about ben bernanke's fed. does it have more of an influence on this economy -- on our markets and the economy than the fed's mission would dictate that it has? >> well, that's a hard question to answer because the fed's mission is to promote maximum employment and stable prices. as you just said, the inflation rate's been very stable over the bernanke era, as it was in the later part of the greenspan era. the fed has been working overtime, so to speak, both figuratively and literally on its em
on on this sunday morning. let's get it back out to sam. sam, talk us through the science here. how much longer should they be nervous in hawaii this morning? >> well, the good news is, dan, that they did everything right here. i mean when you get a 7.7 on the western coast of canada, and you've got nothing but open water between it and hawaii, and this was a subsidence kind of quake, which means the plates are lying underneath each other. the other kicks the plate up. acts like a splash or flipper and creates a wave, if not just one wave, they thought it was four waves or think it's four waves as we've been counting them and have the tsunami warning center. all the buoys mean that those at the coastline are able to monitor the lift in the water, so the buoys got a tail underneath it and the sensor knows how high that wave is. we know they could have been very high. they could have been eight-foot waves but they weren't. anywhere from 6 inches to 2 feet to 4 feet as we've been able to monitor them. the good news. we've seen them move through and usually more than one and been able to watch them
talking about it is the science. that is the person the signs the you can see. and to thank think that how do they do that they are out of control kids. >> and you think that these children are talking about. they do not want to take the next step. >> i have noticed this is not a theory this is a real truth. the moment that you sit down with the bully. that i did write in detention together. -- i did sit down and i ended up talking to her. and this floodgate of understanding opens. because i suddenly understood that she was scared. she was scared as i was. the understanding of being punished for different reasons springs camaraderie. i never said that she was my best friend. but i am saying that it -- brought camaraderie. but it cannot become friends in the and that they were still lead to understanding. >> our skills becoming more proactive? >> yes and no we are being proactive but we're putting up a wrong theory. when i go to speak to schools amasses come to hear that i can pick them out before they even talk. it is mainly body language. and they relate to being an outcast. there is anot
don't respond to hard-line phone calls. or just the science of polling. >> or the number of times i have refused to pick up my phone when i can see it's research firm. but, nonetheless, i think a nightmare frankly, maybe we can all agree on this, is that there are some electoral college/popular vote difference. >> one scenario is that it just doesn't come down to one state, like ohio, is that you got four, or five, states and each one of those five is in that circumstance and then we're in total confusion. >> we have december 31st coming up. not like all the time in the world to make these decisions. >> you talk about ohio, they don't even count all of the absentee votes in ohio until november 16th. it will take longer than that for the provisional votes. andrew, you talked about polls. last time around, our abc news/washington post had president obama's number dead-on. 53%. now romney at 49%. talk about the possibility that governor romney wins the popular vote and loses the electoral college. >> this is our 57th presidential election. in 52 at least, the popular vote and the elect
, schools give a break to students who major in math and science and those are most needed for florida's job market and undergrads studying political science, they have fewer job prospects in the state. >> alisyn: lady liberty. >> cool. >> alisyn: the statue's 126 anniversary and the celebration opening up to the public after a year long renovation and 30 million dollar project including remodeling the staircase to make it easier for visitors to climb and to climb, that was tough. and 26,000 more people visit each other. >> you climbed up and only made it up to the commissar i. >> alisyn: i was exhausted. >> clayton: can i get a coffee? and they put an elevator in there for handicapped individual who never before had a chance to go up and see a portion of the statue of liberty. today it could be open until it's closed later today by the federal government because of-- and meanwhile we have been talking over the last month what happened on september 11th of this year in libya. of course, our ambassador, a member of the embassy staff and two former navy seals were killed. jennifer griffin had
behind us is where the real science is going on. this is information that's being gathered, that can only be gathered by flying into the hurricane. this airplane has a doppler radar in the tail. what the doppler's picking up is showing up right here on these screens. they can then build a model of the storm, analyze the data. it gives us a sense if sandy is getting stronger or weaker, if the winds are getting more intense. we're onboard the hurricane hunter, herman. chris van clees, abc 7. >> a bird's-eye view of what is coming. all right. keep it here on abc for continuous coverage of hurricane sandy. all right. keep it here on abc for continuous coverage of hurricane @ >>> this morning on "world news now" -- surviving hurricane sandy. 50 million people are in the path of this super storm. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- surviving hurricane sandy. 50 million people are in the path of this super storm. and forecasters are warning of life-threatening flooding. >> the massive storm is already crippling the northeast and is about to unleash devastating torrential rains on top of trop
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social media and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his write ago peer in the asian "the wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organization around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here dr. kim. [applause] >>> thank you for your kind introduction. the curry economic institute is hon snored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partner than the edmund school of foreign services and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really i do do think that the 21st century will be seen as asia-pacific century. many of the growth will merge from the region and of course many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the perspective of asian integration and the security problems on the korean peninsula to name a few. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in the region will be critical
.i.h., the national science foundation, so i would take issue with the fact that, you know, the republic of texas is making it all on their own. they're getting substantial benefits from federal research and development dollars. which is fine. i don't have any problem with that at all. but to benefit from the oil industry in such a profound way is a unique situation. we don't have that situation every y -- everywhere. but texas does benefit from nasa, from the national science foundation and the national institutes of health. that's helped spur their economy as well. >> congressman, gary on twitter wants me to ask you, why didn't obama stick his neck out for the nonunion workers who lost their peppings in the auto bailout. can you talk that out? >> that's an urban legend. we are working, nart brown and i are working very hard to help the seven or eight splinter unions that didn't end up doing as well as the u.a.w., the iue crferings wa which had contracts essential to the development of the new general motors. but this is not a union-nonunion issue. there were seven or eight different unions that
. others say it is pretty unusual. i was wondering what the record and science say about the but secular course this storm is taking. >> what makes every storm unique is a combination of things, the time of year, strength of the structure in magnitude and size. sandy is unique in a number of ways. it is certainly not common for a system to come in at this strength. but if you look back in history, tropical cyclones have come up the east coast many times in the past. the whole east coast is vulnerable to storm surges and hurricanes. look at isabel in 2003 that came in a little bit further south and had all the storm surge. it has taken a different path, going it in a different direction than this one is. every storm is unique. this is not 100 percent unprecedented, but certainly not common to have a system of this magnitude coming from this direction at this time of year, and what makes this nearly unprecedented and very unusual is the transition to oppose best tropical cyclone and all the different hazards you have in one time. >> i think this is the only time i know of with the hurrican
of items and save $4 on hills® science diet® dog & cat food. plus, get $5 in holiday bonus bucks with qualifying purchase. only at petsmart®. 1234b sandy, a disaster that played out in real-time on social media, twitter and instagram. look at the tweets. 10 million. ten photos uploaded to into gram every second. this just came in minutes ago. a rescue in little ferry, new jersey. shots of flooding and fires. we've seen them. more of the pictures of queens. that is a train in hoboken. so many scenes playing out like there. we'll have so many more of them for you, "good morning america" we'll have so many more of them for you, "good morning america" continues. t all: charles walgreen had a mission to help people be happy and healthy. from inventing the first chocolate malt... to creating a nonprofit pharmacy for our troops... to the first child safety caps. walgreens has been innovating for over a hundred years. and we're just getting started. with more and more ways to be well every day. here at the corner of happy and healthy. so ditch the brown bag for something better. like ou
in tuition over the next 10 years. [cheers and applause] >> i want to recruit 1,000 math and science teachers so that our kids don't fall behind. i want to train americans with skills that businesses are looking for right now. that's what we're fighting for in this election. that's what real change is. >> i got your back! >> thank you. change comes up to this country's innovation. the great news about the auto industry is we're not just building cars. we're building better cars, innovative cars. cars that by the middle of the next decade will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. here in ohio, it's not just cars that we're starting to manufacture again. we're building long-lasting batteries an wind turbines all across ohio, all across the country. we've got to keep -- we've got to keep our cutting edge technology and research and investment. i don't want a tax code that subsidies oil profits when they're making money hand over fist. i want to support the new technology that will help cut our oil imports in half and i don't want to reward companies for creating those companies overseas. i want t
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense from td ameritrade. >>i jump out of my skin at people when i'm upset. they're doing this this corruption based on corruption based on corruption. >>that's an understatement, eliot. ♪ i've been driving all night and my hand's wet on the wheel ♪ ♪ a voice in my head that drives my heel ♪ >> stephanie miller. >> announcer: is "the stephanie miller show." "the stephanie miller show" is brought to you by the last open road. what is the last open road? you have traveled the last open road? go to lastopenroad.com. i can't think of a more appropriate song. >> stephanie: rob reiner did get a standing ovation for walking and sitting. he walked into the beacon. rock star cheers. somebody said you would totally have gotten third billing if there was a plane crash because rob reiner and earth wind and fire and i were on the same -- getting on any plane with a band you're like oh -- rob reiner and the remaining members
that comes from nih -- the national science foundation. i would take issue that the republic of texas is making it on their own. they are getting substantial benefits from federal research and development sollars, which is fine. -- development dollars, which is fine. the benefit from the oil industry is a unique situation. we do not have that everywhere. texas' benefit from nasa, the national science foundation investment, and the national institutes of health. >> congressman gary wants me to ask you why obama did not stick his neck out for the non-union workers who lost their pensions in the auto bailout. >> that is an urban legend. we are working to help the unions that did not end up doing as well as the uaw and others. but this is not a union, non- union issue. there were seven or eight different unions that did not make out as other unions. there are many salaried folks who are saying this was the president picking the unions over the salary people. that is not true. there are other unions that did not make out -- it was a bankruptcy. it was a difficult decision. it is not true.
that they made. and we often found that this is not a science. someone said this morning it isn't mathematical. well, it is an art. you'll have people disagreeing with in the agency about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. it gives one person for example, in the fbi, the report that we would get. very significant reductions. we would give to another person, much less significant reductions in the derby with each other as to what could be released. we felt strongly that it was not sufficient to simply, with broad strokes, redact all sorts of information from the report that they needed to justify why would harm the national security. which is the standard, after all. by pushing back, we often got much information out into the public that it turned out was able to be released and gave the public an insight on what was happening within the agency. i believe that being within the agency, being inside and having access to information, you have an ability and the role that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseen. you know wh
that this is not a science. so and of this work it wasn't mathematical. it is in part. and you'll have people disagreeing come even within the agency, about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. you give it to one person and for sample in the fbi, the report, and we would get a very significant reduction. would give it to another person, much less significant redactions and they would argue with each other as what could be released. we felt very strongly that it was not sufficient to simply, with a broad strokes, redacted all sorts of information from the report, that they need to justify why would harm national security, which is the standard after all. by pushing back we often got much information out in the public that it turned out wasn't able to be released into the public an insight on what was happening within the agency. and maybe that thing with any agency, being inside and having access to information, you have an ability and the role that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseeing the federal government. because you know w
happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. humans -- sometimes life trips us up. and sometimes, we trip ourselves up, but that's okay. at liberty mutual insurance we can "untrip" you as you go through your life with personalized policies and discounts when you need them most. just call... and speak with a licensed representative about saving on your policy when you get married, move into a new house... [crash!] or add a car to your policy. don't forget to ask about saving up to 10% when you combine your auto and home insurance with liberty mutual. security, coverage, and savings. all the things humans need to make our beautifully imperfect world a little less imperfect. call... and lock in your rate for 12 months. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> let's look at some of the powerful photos come in from the east coast. a gas station, look at this gas station attendant sits in front of a pump as he fills can after can with gasoline. in brooklyn, new york, thousands of people stand in line for buss into manhattan. many comm
is there for a specific reason and not in manchester, 20 miles to the north. there is a lot of science to this. there is a lot of polling that goes into it. it is very strategic. we have had a lot of candidates here for the primary. we have had a lot of exposure to them. certainly, voters here are knowledgeable about who these people are after going through the primary. the different debates that go on. host: neil levesque, executive director of the new hampshire institute for politics, thank you. there are four electoral votes at stake in new hampshire, and it is considered a tight race. it's history of being a swing state continues as it is on our list. our conversation continues about the battle states, the battleground state of new hampshire with -- our competition continues about the battleground states of new hampshire. kathy sullivan is the chairwoman of the democratic party. she tried to us from manchester this morning. if i could begin with the "washington post" piece. republicans say that romney's team is far ahead of what senator john mccain had in place for years ago. but the exten
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. you've heard stephanie's views. >>no bs, authentic, the real thing. >>now, let's hear yours at the only online forum with a direct line to stephanie miller. >>the only thing that can save america now: current television. >>join the debate now. ♪ ♪ >> stephanie: jacki schechner and i. we were making our plans for spinning this week. i'm going to kidnap her and make her spin with me all week. all right. 1-800-steph-12 the phone number toll free. don't forget jacki is in here because they're re-airing our show every day now right after it ends. they'll do a bad -- it is like bad chinese food repeating on you. >> she didn't need to be at current for the other newscast. come down here. >> stephanie: come here, pretty shiny thing. >> it is so far not terrible. >> stephanie: oh honey that's sweet. >> she gets to hear the burps in between commercials. >> there is the smelly food. the burps and all of
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